Returning to Pokémon: Better to Faint With Honour

In my mind, there are few competitions nobler and more respectable than a Pokémon Battle.Pokémon Blue demonstrated to me that even the wildest creature can conduct themselves with fairness and restraint in each encounter. No words are uttered between combatants, yet each knows there place and fights with the upmost honour.

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This is the third time I’ve written about my slightly awkward transition from Pokémon Blue toPokémon Y. Last week I grumbled about how in my day we got by with only five Poké Balls and didn’t need all these fancy versions. Since then I have become a little more open minded; after reading your comments and recommendations I went and bought a batch of “Quick Balls” and haven’t looked back. Thanks to your responses I’m slightly less of an old gamer when playing Pokémon.

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Returning to Pokémon: confused by Poké Balls.

Last week, I touched on my reactions to Pokémon after skipping four generations. I’ve enjoyed the game so far but many of the new elements and changes have left me feeling old or confused. Last week I referred to the overwhelming sensation that Pokémon Y seemed to be in much more of a hurry than Pokémon Blue. Whilst I’ve enjoyed my time in Generation VI immensely, there are other aspects that have left me feeling out of touch with the Pokémon series.

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Firstly, the sheer amount of new items filling up the inventory in Pokémon Y is extraordinary. In my earlier adventures with Pokémon, there were five types of Poké Ball. The most important trio were “Poké”, “Great” and “Ultra” Balls, which were all an experienced monster catcher needed. Each variant was more expensive than the last, but had more chance of snapping shut. The Master Ball stayed in your backpack forever and Safari Balls were as radical and fancy as Pokémon capture became.

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​Returning to Pokémon: Why is everybody in a rush?

I’ve often found that I respond to new ideas in an open-minded way. I can be relied on the react favourably to change. A shift from the expected norm will not cause be to moan or grumble. If change is for the better, than I can easily get on board. Nevertheless, a lot of change all at once can cause me a few problems. It’s my own fault really; had I followed the Pokémon games through the generations I’m sure I’d not feel so out of touch.

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I played the first generation of Pokémon obsessively. I fondly remember the hours and days sunk into Pokémon Blue, catching, levelling and fighting my way through every possible challenge the game had to offer. Yet, when the next instalment of Pokémon rolled round, I didn’t jump ship. This is partly due to the feeling that starting a new game meant starting over again. In my school, very few people switched to generation II; no one wanted to get the new game if no one else was going to share the experience. If we wanted to play Pokémon, we had Red and Blue (and Yellow).

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