Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Erkling

Dungeons & Dragons is high-adventure for a lot of the time. Tolkien-esque heroic tales full of might and magic. Sometimes though, D&D adventures stride out into the horror genre.

Playing horror-based D&D is rarely an intensely scary experience. It’s hard to jumpscare when you’re carefully describing the world. A player can only be as creeped out as their imagination will allow. Yet you can build some pretty unsettling, twisted moments. The campaign book Curse of Strahd is especially effective because it leans into camp-horror; a mixed of sinister and the comical that blends really well together.

The Fantastic Beast known as an Erkling immediately inspires a horrific encounter for any D&D game.

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Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Dugbog

This journey has its ups and downs.

From a dozen deadly dragons, to a Dugbog. From giant reptilian, fire-spitting monstrosities, to a small amphibian that looks like a log. It’s a bit of a drop off. Nevertheless, I said I would turn all the Fantastic Beasts into D&D monsters, and so I shall.

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Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Doxy

Another easy one this week. A curtain-nibbling, beetle-winged pest of the Potterverse gets the D&D treatment. The Doxy isn’t going to challenge most RPG adventurers, but it’s a fun little nuisance. A Dungeon Master could have some fun telling characters that they see a fairy on a nearby tree, only to discover that it’s this angry blighter.

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Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Diricawl

It’s always nice to learn that the human race didn’t wipe out a species. It turns out, the Dodo is still alive. The species is actually a ‘Diricawl’, a magical bird that can teleport. So it’s not extinct, it just learned that humans are unsafe spaces and made themselves scarce. Good for them.

So for today’s converstion from Fantastic Beasts to Dungeons & Dragons, we have a lil’ fluffy bird that can teleport.

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Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Clabbert

Last week it was a lion with goat feet and a crab that eats magic. This week we have a monkey frog. Fantasy monsters are a little basic sometimes. Although the monkey frog has a weird, red wart on its head that lights up, which is definitely unique…

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Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Chizpurfle

When I first decided I wanted to convert all the Fantastic Beasts into Dungeons & Dragons monsters, I was thinking of all the giant spiders, snakes and cats. But today it’s a tiny crab. And that’s okay too…I guess.

To be fair, the Chizpurfle does have a few little quirks for me to work on. It’s drawn towards magic, gorges itself on magic items and hangs out in large swarms. That’s not so bad.

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Fantastic Beasts and How to Slay Them: Flobberworm

I was worried about this one. This is the most powerful creature in the entire Potterverse. I was not sure I could make the conversion to Dungeons & Dragons monster. After hours of research and careful calculation, I think I have a worthy D&D stat block for the most Fantastic Beast.

The FLOBBERWORM
Beware the Flobberworm
Thank You For Reading

Happy 1st April. Want some proper Fantastic Beasts for your D&D game? Look here!

This Wound Matters: Video Game Storytelling

We don’t always play the video game in front of us. Control is often wrested from us, and we are obliged to watch closely. Cutscenes and Quick Time Events interrupt the flow, to push the plot forwards or to steer us down a very specific track. When a game shifts into a lower gear, and player agency is restricted, it is hopefully for a very good reason.

One of the particular reasons a game does this is because the protagonist has suffered a severe, sometimes mortal, wound.

Lot’s of games have this moment. a dramatic scene in which the player-character is reduced to a slow, lumbering mess, desperately dragging themselves to safety or performing one last heroic deed. Sometimes, it creates a deliberately heart-wrenching moment. It’s also a very strange moment from a game logic perspective. Having walked off so many terrible, violent attacks, we are told that this wound is the one that could be our downfall.

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Which Games Would Benefit from a Zelda Weapon?

I’m one of those gamers that can’t possibly take on the final boss if there is still a collectible out there. Each Zelda series has always been full of items and weapons, but when playing Link Between Worlds it really strikes me just how much item variety there is.

This thought then manifested: why do Legend of Zelda games get so many tools and weapons, but other game characters are restricted to a pile of slightly different guns. Could a game or franchise be vastly improved by borrowing an item from Link?

image

Call of Duty found the Power Glove!

I’m of the opinion that the ‘realistic’ shooter is overrated. After all, Call of Duty: Ghosts includes an orbital space station, a guerrilla team with more high-end tech than the crew of the enterprise, and dogs with the fighting prowess of Rambo. I think Link’s Power Glove would fit in nicely.

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